Papers at JURIX 2012

I’m co-author of two papers at The 25th International Conference on Legal Knowledge and Information Systems (JURIX 2012), Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Links to the final drafts are forthcoming.

A Model-Based Critique Tool for Policy Deliberation
Adam Wyner, Maya Wardeh, Trevor Bench-Capon, and Katie Atkinson

Abstract
Domain models have proven useful as the basis for the construction and evaluation of arguments to support deliberation about policy proposals. Using a model provides the means to systematically examine and understand the fine-grained objections that individuals might have about the policy. While in previous approaches, a justification for a policy proposal is presented for critique by the user, here, we reuse the domain model to invert the roles of the citizen and the government: a policy proposal is elicited from the citizen, and a software agent automatically and systematically critiques it relative to the model and the government’s point of view. Such an approach engages citizens in a critical dialogue about the policy actions, which may lead to a better understanding of the implications of their proposals and that of the government. A web-based tool that interactively leads users through the critique is presented.

Bibtex
@INPROCEEDINGS{WynerEtAlCritique2012,
author = {Adam Wyner and Wardeh, Maya and Trevor Bench-Capon and Katie Atkinson},
title = {A Model-Based Critique Tool for Policy Deliberation},
booktitle = {Proceedings of 25th International Conference on Legal Knowledge and Information Systems (JURIX 2012)},
year = {2012},
pages = {167-176},
address = {Amsterdam},
publisher = {IOS Press}
comment = {Legal Knowledge and Information Systems. Jurix 2012: The AA-th Annual Conference}
}

An Empirical Approach to the Semantic Representation of Laws
Adam Wyner, Johan Bos, Valerio Basile, and Paulo Quaresma

Abstract
To make legal texts machine processable, the texts may be represented as linked documents, semantically tagged text, or translated to formal representations that can be automatically reasoned with. The paper considers the latter, which is key to testing consistency of laws, drawing inferences, and providing explanations relative to input. To translate laws to a form that can be reasoned with by a computer, sentences must be parsed and formally represented. The paper presents the state-of-the-art in automatic translation of law to a machine readable formal representation, provides corpora, outlines some key problems, and proposes tasks to address the problems.

Bibtex
@INPROCEEDINGS{WynerEtAlSemanticRep2012,
author = {Adam Wyner and Bos, Johan and Valerio Basile and Paulo Quaresma},
title = {An Empirical Approach to the Semantic Representation of Law},
booktitle = {Proceedings of 25th International Conference on Legal Knowledge and Information Systems (JURIX 2012)},
year = {2012},
pages = {177-180},
address = {Amsterdam},
publisher = {IOS Press}
}

Shortlink to this page.

By Adam Wyner

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.